A Discriminatory Rewarding Mechanism for Sybil detection by Asim Kumar Pal, Debabrata Nath and Sumit Chakraborty

By Asim Kumar Pal, Debabrata Nath and Sumit Chakraborty

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Chapter 6 focuses on your job and your employer. You need to understand both as fully as possible to make a good decision. 36 5 CHAPTER FIVE Signs that it is time to leave your job Personal audit In this chapter, I set out ways for you to consider warning signs telling you that it is time to leave your job. Very typically, this is a time clouded in emotion because very often we are dissatisfied with our job or unhappy or there may be some interpersonal issues, which are promoting the thoughts of moving elsewhere.

Endless prevarication about career planning. – Generally, this masks a high level of anxiety about the decision. Occasionally, it can be due to the individual being a poor decision maker. In goal terms, it reflects an obsession with the shorter term needs and not the longer term goals. It can also be an attention-grabbing device – the person plays the role of the victim in a quandary, thus ensuring lots of reassuring and ego-boosting feedback from friends – ‘of course you should apply, you are marvellous’ etc.

This can result in boredom and frustration. The behaviour is often rationalized as the ‘stick to what I know’ philosophy. It sounds plausible, indeed compelling, until you realize the consequences of such an approach. Alas, the world of work rarely is kind to devotees of the ‘do nowt’ approach. Jobs, products and customers change regularly and rapidly. This world will not fit neatly and conveniently into the unchanging and highly predictable framework that you have established for yourself. You are essentially setting yourself up for failure.

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